Installing Puppet Enterprise on CentOS 7 in AWS EC2 with custom public HostName

Hey,

I ran into a few issues when I wanted to install Puppet Enterprise 2-17 in AWS as an EC2 instance. The main issues were

Summary

  • Need to use hostnamectl and cloud.cfg to change my hostname, as I wanted puppet on a public address, not private address, just for a POC
  • I was using a t2.nano and t2.micro, which will not work with Puppet Enterprise 2017 (puppet-enterprise-2017.2.2-el-7-x86_64). The error you get is just Failed to run PE Installer…… So I used a t2.medium to get around the issue.
  • The usual /etc/hosts file needs some settings and DNS registration (Route53 for me)
  • Disabled SELinux (We usually use a VPN)
  • Configure security groups and have 4433 as backup port (Probably not needed)

Preliminary Install Tasks

  1. Get the latest image from CentOS 7 (x86_64) – with Updates HVM
  2. Spin up an instance with at least 4GB memory, I had a lot of installation issues with applying the catalog with low memory. T2.Medium should work. Bigger is better!
    [puppet.rangerrom.com] Failed to run PE installer on puppet.rangerrom.com.
  3. If you not using a VPN then ensure you setup an elastic IP mapped to the instance for the public DNS name
    ElasticIP.PNG
  4. Register the hostname and elastic IP in DNS
    DNS.PNG
  5. Add you hostnames to /etc/hosts (Important!), note I also added puppet as this is the default for installs. This is a crucial step, so make sure you add your hostnames that you want to use. Put the public hostname first. As this is our primary hostname127.0.0.1  puppet.rangerrom.com puppet localhost
  6. Change the hostname of your EC2 Instance. We need to do the following

    #hostnamectl
    #sudo hostnamectl set-hostname puppet.rangerrom.com –static
    #sudo vi /etc/cloud/cloud.cfg

  7. Add the following to the end of cloud.cfg
    preserve_hostname: true
  8. This is the error I got when I first installed puppet (Due to low memory), therefore we will add port 4433 as well to the AWS security in the next step. I think this was due to insufficient memory, so use a T2.Medium instance size, so you have a minimum of 4GB of memory, else java kills itself. However I add it as a backup here in case you run some other service on 443.

    #sudo vi /var/log/puppetlabs/installer/2017-08-08T02.09.32+0000.install.log

    Failed to apply catalog: Connection refused – connect(2) for “puppet.rangerrom.com” port 4433

  9. Create a security group with the following ports open and also do the same for the Centos Firewall.
    PuppeSecurityGroups
  10. Run  netstat -anp | grep tcp to ensure no port conflicts.
  11. Disable SELinux or have it configured to work in a Puppet Master environment. Edit

    #sudo vi /etc/sysconfig/selinux

    set
    SELINUX=disabled

  12. Edit the sudo vi /etc/ssh/sshd_config and enable Root Logins
    PermitRootLogin yes
  13. Download Puppet Enterprise

    #curl -O https://s3.amazonaws.com/pe-builds/released/2017.2.2/puppet-enterprise-2017.2.2-el-7-x86_64.tar.gz
    #tar -xvf puppet-enterprise-2017.2.2-el-7-x86_64.tar.gz

  14. Install NC and use it to test if your ports are accessible.
    sudo yum install nc
    nc -nlvp 3000 (Run in one terminal) 
  15. nc puppet 3000 ( Run from another terminal)
    NC Test Firewalls.PNG
    This is a great way to ensure firewall rules are not restricting your installation. Secondly we testing that the local server can resolve itself, as it is important that you can resolve puppet and also your custom FQDN before running PE install.
  16. Reboot and run hostnamectl, the new hostname should be preserved.

    #sudo hostnamectl set-hostname puppet.rangerrom.com –static
    [centos@ip-172-31-13-233 ~]$ hostnamectl
    Static hostname: puppet.rangerrom.com
    Transient hostname: ip-172-31-13-233.ap-southeast-2.compute.internal
    Icon name: computer-vm
    Chassis: vm
    Machine ID: 8bd05758fdfc1903174c9fcaf82b71ca
    Boot ID: 0227f164ff23498cbd6a70fb71568745
    Virtualization: xen
    Operating System: CentOS Linux 7 (Core)
    CPE OS Name: cpe:/o:centos:centos:7
    Kernel: Linux 3.10.0-514.26.2.el7.x86_64
    Architecture: x86-64

Installation

  1. Now that we done all our preinstall checks, kick off the installer.

    #sudo ./puppet-enterprise-installer

  2. Enter 1 for a guided install.
  3. Wait until it asks you to connect to the server on https://<fqdn&gt;:3000
    This is what occurs if you did not configure your hostname correctly and you want a public hostname (EC2 internal is default):
    PuppetInstallStage1.PNG

    We want our public hostname.
    PuppetInstallStage1Correct
    Puppet will basically run a thin web server to complete the installation with the following command:
    RACK_ENV=production /opt/puppetlabs/puppet/share/installer/vendor/bundler/bin/thin start –debug -p 3000 -a 0.0.0.0 –ssl –ssl-disable-verify &> /dev/null

  4. Recall, we have the above FQDN in our host file, yours will be your hostname that you setup.
  5. Visit your Puppetmaster site at https://fqdn:3000
  6. Ensure in DNS Alias, you add puppet and all other DNS names you want to use. Otherwise the installation will fail.

    You should see the correct default hostname, if not, you got issues…. I added some alias names such as puppet and my internal and external ec2 addresses.

    PuppetWebDNSAlias.PNG

  7. Set an Admin password and click next
  8. Check and double check the settings to confirm.
    PuppetConfirm.PNG
  9. Check the validation rules, since this is for testing, I am happy with the warnings. It would be awesome if puppetlabs did DNS name resolution validation checks on the HostName. Anyways, here we get a warning about memory, 4GB is what is needed, so if you have install failures it may be due to memory!
    Validator.PNG
  10. I am feeling lucky, lets try with 3533MB of RAM 🙂SuccessInstall.PNG
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XCSoar on a Kobo Touch 2.0 with BlueFly GPS

Hi,

I decided it was time to get a Kobo Touch 2.0 and get XCSoar installed on it, complete with GPS. I chose the Touch 2.0 (Amazon.de).

  1. Buy a Kobo Touch 2.0
  2. Backup the SD Card
  3. You will need to purchase a BlueFlyVario_TTL_GPS_v11. I chose the TTL, as the USB version is prone to breaking the USB connector.
  4. Download and 3D print the cover from ThingVerse.
  5. A Soldering Iron Solder and a few tools.
  6. A spare circuit board to practice your soldering skills. You cannot afford to make a mistake when soldering.
  7. Star Phillips screw driver
  8. 3mm Drill bit
  9. 3M x 6mm bolts and nuts, used to fix the  cover to the case. It is tricky getting the nut to fit in the small gap on the Touch 2.0. I just drill holes on the side of the Kobo and slide the nut in like a coin slot.
  10. Software for the Kobo. You can download it here. That link has pictures and all the software to get the Kobo up and running with XCSoar 6.8.

There are detailed instructions you can follow here.

http://blueflyvario.blogspot.com.au/2014/11/kobo-glo-install.html

The reason for this post, is to compliment the above article with some pictures.

 

Inventory

Solder Station

Kobo Touch 2.0 Serial Port

Important: The RX on the Kobo Port goes to TX on the BlueFly. I use the screw to ground the circuit (yellow wire). Green Wire goes to V. Black and Red is TX and  RX on Kobo and switched around on BlueFly.

Soldered To Kobo 2.0

KoboRoot.tgz

Use a Linux Operating System to copy KoboRoot.tgz to the hidden .kobo folder and then reboot the Kobo. I just take out the SD Card, plug it into a machine with Linux or on Windows with a Virtual Machine running Linux (I use Kali Distro).

Customise XCSoar

Once rebooted and XCSoar is running, go to Nickle and then plug in the Kobo 2.0, then just copy additional files for XCSoar. E.g. Maps, Waypoints

Device Settings

Make sure you go into XCSoar Config -> Devices and set the device settings for the BlueFly Vario. Once done, use the monitor button to check feedback. (Ensure the Vario is turned on, by pushing the button. It will make an annoying sound continuously.)…it was music to my ears.

Events – BlueFly.xci

In XCSoar, register the BlyeFly.xci file as an Event in Language/Input. Ensure advance mode is on. This gives you a cool menu for BlueFly where you can set the volume of the beautiful sound it makes.

bluefly.xci

Go outside, and test your new navigation tool to compliment your flight deck. Happy flying with loads of battery time 🙂

Tips:

I made two holes on the bottom side of the Kobo, to get the 3mm Nuts in, so I could bolt down the cover. Maybe you can get it working with 2mm bolts and nuts….

Only remove the Circuit Board screws. Do not remove the screws that hold the screen in. Leave the screen in the device during the entire modification process.  Keep all wires above the circuit board, else the screen will not function correctly as it relies on a certain amount of pressure around the perimeter of the device. Look carefully under the circuit board, you will see lots of connectors around it. I initially tried to solder from under the circuit board (Easier to solder), but this cause a lot of issues with the screen touch sensitivity.

Nickly and the E-Reader still work after the modifications. If yours does not. Restore the SD card from a backup you made and go through the software modification again. e.g. 1. Copy the koboroot file to .kobo -> Reboot -> Customise XCSoar -> Nickel should work again.

if you ever reset the device with a long press on the power button, it may break Nickel and you can only use XCSoar without the e-reader. The symptom is Nickel will show a black screen.